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Wind Industry Spokesman Labels Legislative Opponent “Dr. Kevorkian” of Oklahoma Economy

Wind Coalition leader Jeff Clark makes it clear what he thinks of one legislator and others fighting the wind industry in Oklahoma. Over the weekend in an interview with Scott Mitchell’s “Hot Seat” on News 9, Clark called Rep. Mark McBride the “Doctor Kevorkian” of the Oklahoma economy.

His reference came after the Moore legislator recently called for the legislature to remove the sales tax exemption for the wind industry.

“This kind of rhetoric from Rep. McBride is unhealthy for the economy,” said Clark. “He’s the Doctor Kevorkian of the Oklahoma economy. He’s gonna kill this thing with the lethal injection of this kind of rhetoric. It’s just not needed.”

He used the political discussion show to question where Rep. McBride and other wind industry opponents have been, pointing out that two tax incentives for wind were phased out in 2015 and the last incentive ended in 2017.

“I think what he’s failing to tell the viewers is that today, a project built by a wind company in Oklahoma qualifies for no state tax incentives,” added Clark.

He called it wrong for opponents to pit renewable energy against natural gas, calling it a “fool’s errand” and a dangerous message for the state of Oklahoma.

“I would say to Rep. McBride and to the other folks who are promoting this anti-wind message, that you can have your own opinion and we can disagree, but you cannot have your own set of facts,” concluded Clark.

McBride is vice chairman of the House Energy and Natural Resources Committee and recently was a guest columnist for the Journal Record where he said “it’s time to put an end to government handouts and ensure the wind industry becomes a more productive part of the Oklahoma economy.”

He urged the legislature to end the wind energy’s sales tax exemption and create a production tax on wind energy generated in the state.

“The wind industry is the only industry not to pay a production tax when harnessing the state’s natural resources,” argued McBride.

 

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